Herbs for Hayfever

ACHOO!

I love living in the countryside. At this time of year, everything is in full bloom – gardens are bursting into life.

And an army of bleary-eyed, snot ridden people are cursing – while those free from allergies look ever-so-slightly smug and probably do things like tramping through fields of long grass and rolling down small embankments.

I too, suffer from the dreaded curse of hayfever. Admittedly, it’s not as bad as it was when I was a child, but it seems to have made a reappearance in my life since I became attuned to Reiki and became more sensitive to various things around me.

I’m not even going to go into what is in allergy relief tablets because I can’t spell or say half  the ingredients. Also, I am in my little writing office which has no Internet so I cannot check.

But you are here for a herbal remedy though, aren’t you?

Here is a wonderful list of herbs which play a part in easing your hayfever symptoms. You may want to try one and work through them, or combine a couple in your chosen method to see which work best for you…

Peppermint

Do you get a stuffy nose at this time of year? Peppermint is the decongestant for you! Use it in an inhalation or as a tea – Peppermint teabags are widely available now although the taste can take a little getting used to!

Chamomile

Chamomile can be used in the same methods as Peppermint; again teabags are widely available so you don’t have to spend all morning making and brewing your own mixtures. Chamomile’s properties are anti-inflammatory and anti-allergy. A good one to grow in the garden (it will spread).Chamomile can be used in the same methods as Peppermint; again teabags are widely available so you don’t have to spend all morning making and brewing your own mixtures. Chamomile’s properties are anti-inflammatory and anti-allergy. A good one to grow in the garden (it will spread).

chamomile
photo credit: Bishwo Ghimire via photopin cc

Nettle

Yay for nettles! My new neighbours probably think I’m going nuts when I water my nettles, but they are so useful I want them to stay! Nettles were traditionally used as a remedy for asthma, and can be taken as tea (again, widely sold) or eaten (you will have a mouth afterwards, honest) – cook them as you would spinach.

Honey & Lemon

This is the traditional remedy for colds, and so brings its soothing and healing properties to relieving hayfever symptoms too.

Cinnamon

I know it’s July, but just like Honey & Lemon, Cinnamon sorts out those pesky symptoms shared by hayfever and colds alike. It also generally strengthens tissues (no, not the one you have stuck to your nose, although perhaps that would be useful). Cinnamon can be taken as a tea, tincture or inhalation; if you are a big Cinnamon fan you can also just chew a stick of it, though personally I would rather continue to sneeze everywhere than eat one of those…

Thyme

Thyme is one of my herb garden favourites, and can be used either in an inhalation or in a homemade syrup to help with the wheezy coughing brought on by hayfever.

Liquorice Root

This can be chewed (again, I’d rather not), or taken as a tincture. Liquorice is an anti-inflammatory, so it helps to heal and protect the mucus membranes which take a battering during hayfever season.

Marigold

As an anti-inflammatory, Marigold is great at supporting the immune system. Probably best to have this one in tea.

ginger-root
photo credit: SteveC. via photopin cc

Ginger

You either love it or you hate it! Ginger has a warming effect, and in doing so helps to loosen that pesky mucus. If you’re a Ginger fan (guess what, I’m not!) you can be completly mad and chew it to unblock your sinuses. I have got as far as allowing it into my tea which I consider progress.

Mullein Leaf

Not perhaps quite as well known as its other buddies on the list, Mullein Leaf is a decongestant, anti-inflammatory and expectorant – taken in a tea or tincture it’s an old-school remedy for dry coughs and bronchitis.

 

The easiest way to take most herbs for hayfever is to buy them as teabags, then you can just pop the kettle on and off you go, however – if you fancy having a go at making the herbs into a tea, tincture, syrup or inhalation yourself, I will cover how to do so in my next blog post!

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